Americans with Disabilities Act

Americans with Disabilities Act

Additional Info

Additional Info

Additional Info

  • Description

    The ADA covers a wide variety of facilities, including places of public accommodation, commercial facilities, and state and local government facilities. The Board's ADA Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG), which primarily cover new construction and alterations, include specifications for accessible means of egress, emergency alarms, and signage. Model building codes, life safety codes, and state access codes also address these and other elements related to emergency egress.

Additional Info

Additional Info

Additional Info

Additional Info

  • Description There are over 54 million citizens with disabilities who want and need access to work and the buildings in which people work. Apart from all ethical considerations, the law demands that people with disabilities are accommodated. These symbols advertise your accessibility to employees, customers, audiences, and anyone else who needs access to your building or offices. Examples of places you’ll want to promote your accessibility include: advertisements, newsletters, conference and program brochures, membership forms, building signage, floor plans and maps. Any copy accompanying the symbols should focus on the accommodation or service, not on who uses it. For example, “Ramped Entrance” may accompany the wheelchair symbol. This is important because, not only do individuals in wheelchairs use ramps, but so do people with baby carriages, luggage, packages, etc. Language that fosters dignity is important too. For example, “Reserved Parking” or “Accessible Parking” may be used with the wheelchair symbol to indicate parking spaces designated for people with disabilities.

Additional Info

  • Description For most people, understanding the collection of rights which apply to a given situation is more important than knowledge of each law viewed separately. It is for attorneys to delve into law books to apply statutes, regulations and judicial interpretations to the facts of a particular case. This chapter will seek to provide the broader understanding for everyone in four significant areas -- employment, housing, public accommodations and education. At the same time, it gives specific guidance for lawyers. The length and nature of the discussion in each area reflects the varying degrees of attention each area has received in the legislatures and in the courts.
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