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Family Care and Caregiving

Family Care and Caregiving

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  • Description Caring for an aging parent, elderly spouse, domestic partner or close friend presents difficult challenges – especially when a crisis hits and you are suddenly faced with the responsibilities of elder care. Perhaps your aging mother has fallen, is hospitalized with a broken hip and needs to go to a rehab facility or nursing home to recover. Caregiving can also begin as a result of a series of unsettling mishaps and warning signs that indicate a need for long term senior care. Perhaps your elderly spouse has wandered off and gotten lost several times. Or a long-time friend has lost a lot of weight and rarely leaves home.

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  • Description A caregiver is anyone who provides assistance to someone who is in need of care. This could involve caring for a spouse who has suffered a stroke, a child with muscular dystrophy, a mother-in-law with Alzheimer's disease, or a grandfather with cancer. Most caregivers are unpaid family members or friends who provide care on either a full- or part-time basis. It is estimated that 80 percent of caregivers provide caregiving assistance seven days per week, and the care usually involves personal care assistance and household maintenance chores. Caregiving can be stressful and may contribute to serious illness and depression. Studies show that 16 percent of caregivers report that their health has worsened since taking on the caregiver role, and about half of caregivers who care for someone with Alzheimer's disease develop psychological distress. In addition, caregiving can result in new financial burdens, with 40 percent of caregivers incurring new financial expenses for care related products, services, and activities. It is estimated that 26 percent of caregivers spend up to 10 percent of their monthly income on caregiving activities.

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  • Description Caregivers' Resources: Find a nursing home, assisted living, or hospice; check your eligibility for benefits; get resources for long-distance care giving; review legal issues; and find support for caregivers.

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  • Description AlzOnline believes that throughout your caregiving journey you will have questions related to the many aspects of caring for a loved one. We want to help meet these challenges by providing quality caregiver education, information, and support.
Communicate Openly By Dr. Marion Somers, Ph. D., Dr. Marion Tips Keep your sentences short and concise. Ask simple questions and wait for the answer before rushing to the next subject. You have to give your elder time to process and formulate answers. Limit your vocabulary and stay on one subject, one sentence at a time. Begin communication with a one-on-one discussion. Ask questions like "Tell me about your childhood, your children, your husband, your wife." Be careful of sending mixed messages or using slang that may not be understood. Ensure what you're saying is accurate. If it's not true,…
Disability.gov's caregiving section contains a broad range of resources for family caregivers. In addition, this guide connects you to programs, services, government agencies and organizations that can help you as you care for a spouse, child, parent or other family member.

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  • Description ElderCare Online is a beacon for people caring for aging loved ones. Whether you are caring for a spouse, parent, relative or neighbor, we are committed to providing an online community where supportive peers and professionals help you improve quality of life for yourself and your elder.
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